Mobile vs PC, and the Winner is??

May 5, 2015 | Mobile Learning

”To be happy in this world, first you need a cell phone and then you need an airplane. Then you’re truly wireless” Ted Turner, Brainyquote.

You may not have invested in a private jet (just yet…), but you most probably possess at least 1 smartphone, right?

If so, do you regularly surf on the Internet using your mobile?
According to an Ovum study (a leading market research and consulting company focused on converging IT, telecoms and media markets), in 2015, 1 billion of us are connecting to the World Wide Web via their cellphone alone! And by 2017, as illustrated by Infographic, smartphones will represent 70% of connected device shipments.

One might wonder, what kind of information are we googling, while sipping on our regular lattes, waiting for the bus, or while faking interest in a boring speech?

Well, among many other things, we want to stay tuned to the news, up to speed with current affairs around the world.
This trend is showing up in stats. A survey conducted by Pew Research Centre reveals that out of 50 news websites interrogated, 39 now get most of their traffic from mobile devices rather than from desktop computers.

As a result, media increasingly invest in mobile ads and tailor their content for the small screen. The same Pew Research survey also explains that mobile ad spending soared a staggering 78 percent in 2015, accounting for 37 percent of all digital spending. Mobile surfing has become the king of the online media castle.

Add to this that Google plans to launch its own mobile phone network, called “Nova” project, giving rise to valuable mobile networks handling improvements. In this ambient IT advancement age we’re currently experiencing, we may soon be tempted to retitle Lewis Carroll 1865 classic “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” as “Alice’s Ad-ventures in Mobile land” as we tell our kids bedtime stories!

As a MVNO – Mobile Virtual Network Operator, Google will offer quality leverage to its Subscribers. First by allowing to switch seamlessly between mobile phone and Wi-Fi signals and between the masts of competing mobile phone networks. Second, by proposing an automatic redial on communication accidental cut…

Google’s ultimate goal, as described by its second in command Sundar Pichai, is to “beam internet connections to the earth’s remotest reaches, where four billion people have poor Internet connections or simply live offline”.

No doubt that with beliefs and applied efforts from companies such as Google and Teach on Mars, mobile devices will soon land in Unchartered IT-erritories. What do you think?